Translate

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Pioneers With Purpose

Finally, Pioneers With Purpose is available on NOOK at Barnes & Noble!!  A great book to share with your children of a true saga of two families sharing their trek to Indian Territory in 1866.
Follow this URL for the excitement only a real western tale of trials what those pioneer men and women endured so that their prodigy would have a home in a land which allowed religious freedom, the right to free speech and the right to protect your family from all intruders. http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/pioneers-with-purpose-kathleen-boston-mccune/1118664909
Excerpt:
"It was July of 1861 and Pap had just finished reading the dirty and scribbled note thrown through our parlor window tied to a rock.  It read:
            “If yu valu yer lif yu betr git out a the Ozarks”
“Perry, where are you when I need you?” I wondered silently.
We lived in Ozark County, Missouri just one-half mile from the ArKanzas line.[1]  I had just become engaged to Perry Campbell, the handsomest and most Christian man in my memory and my father’s business partner’s son in the making and selling of Peach Brandy.
 Even though I had just turned twenty-five on November 10th, 1860, barely nine months ago, I did not feel as old as some of the women here in the Ozark County of Missouri treat me.  For most of them any woman over the age of fourteen who is not married is considered to be an old maid.  In our family, until the proper match is made in which both parents and the intended all agree that the match is right, there is no marriage.  I have to admit I am more comfortable with our traditions and am glad for rules which make sense and give guidance for the future.
Both Perry’s and my families have been helping the slaves escape across the North Fork of the White River from ArKanzas to freedom in the North and we were now being threatened with our lives.
 Pap said, “We are going to escape as soon as possible and enlist all of our families’ help, cousins who do not agree with us are not being told of any of our plans.  However, we are going to stay in Southern Missouri as long as possible to help the slaves who are trying to find their freedom with precious little help. “



[1] This is now located in the Mark Twin National Forest

Friday, November 15, 2013

The Valentine Perfect Gift for the Sailor in your life....

Stewart Douglas Boston has written his second book  which is a collection of short stories derived from his experience in the Navy as an Officer of the U.S.S. California CGN-36 which accompanied the Nimitz during the Viet Nam War.  His tales share the visits ashore as well as the trials of sailors while at sea, sparing no detail of the pain suffered those who received "Dear Johns" while serving their Country.

This is the true story of Stewart Douglas Boston born May 8, 1949….short stories of his childhood, teen years, college years and Navy Boot Camp in San Diego.  From there he sees most of the World while on cruises where he eventually earns the rank of 1st Class Petty Officer in charge of the engine room aboard the nuclear powered U.S.S. California CGN-36.  Over seven years with his ship escort to the Nimitz on her starboard side, he and his fellow crewmen toured and visited England, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Gibraltar, Egypt and other Northern Africa cities as well as Gitmo on Cuba and other islands.  This is a fun read which becomes touching as he deals with his fellow Sailors when they receive Dear John letters from their women while at sea where they are unable to deal with them.

A must read for all Sailors who have spent time at sea and their families who have endured their absence.

Friday, July 19, 2013

New Book out by my brother: The Salina,Kansas Bostons

Now available on Amazon: Stewart's new book THE SALINA, KANSAS BOSTON'S is a compendium of the history and current Boston Family from the lineage containing Bostons, Johnsons, Stewarts, Harris', Means, Mott, Weeks, Ross, and Bieri.

It is also the memories and Sagas handed down from one generatin to the other from these families when most frightened or enjoying life to its hilt or both.

Many photographs are included showing the family in the 1850s until today which will be of interest to family and friends, but also to those who are interested or related to Scottish, Swedish, Norwegian, English, French or just plain American who are basically just good Christian folks who love one another and their fellow men and women and want what is right and fair for all. family from the 1850s until today and should be of interest to not only family and friends, but also to those who are interested in what has happened to a family comprised of Scottish, Swedish, Norwegian, English, French and just plain Americans who are basically Christian folks who love one another and their fellow men and women.


This is an invitation to share in our family and feel what we have felt over the generations.


ENJOY!!


Friday, June 14, 2013

KATHLEEN BOSTON MCCUNE HAS WRITTEN A NEW BOOK..

http://www.publishamerica.net/product52641.html
Dear friend of Kathleen Boston McCune,

PublishAmerica is proud to announce the release of Kathleen Boston McCune's new book: Treasured Pioneers!

Here's what the book is about: Kansas became the goal for the Johnson and Campbell clans who were forced to find safe territory after helping the slaves in Arkansas seek asylum in Missouri on their way to the North. This is their true story told by word of mouth and finally written by Sarah Anne Campbell Boston before she passed to her Maker in the winter of 1951. Remembering being thrown into a flour bin larger than she was at barely two years old she had vivid recollections of the Indians and where she fit into the family. The rest is a collection of tales as related by her husband, Lon Boston a real cowboy who knew tales he couldn't share with a woman, and her Ma and Pa who left letters and books of their families still in Scotland, Norway and Switzerland. / I hope readers enjoy the memories as much as I enjoyed remembering not only the sagas but those who shared them with all the gusto only someone who had lived them could express. / This book, though true, includes imagined dialogue to make the story more enjoyable.

We are offering you an opportunity to secure your personal copy of Kathleen Boston McCune’s exceptional book today.  Please click here: http://www.publishamerica.net/product52641.html to secure your copy of the book*, then click Add to Cart. For an introductory discount of 20%, use this coupon code: Discount20.
  

Monday, March 25, 2013

Serenia's Wedding Day......


It was July of 1861 and Pap had just finished reading the dirty and scribbled note thrown through our parlor window tied to a rock.  It read:
            “If yu valu yer lif yu betr git out a the Ozarks”
“Perry, where are you when I need you?” I wondered silently.
We lived in Ozark County, Missouri just one-half mile from the ArKanzas line.[1]  I had just become engaged to Perry Campbell, the handsomest and most Christian man in my memory and my father’s business partner’s son in the making and selling of Peach Brandy.
 Even though I had just turned twenty-five on November 10th, 1860, barely nine months ago, I did not feel as old as some of the women here in the Ozark County of Missouri treat me.  For most of them any woman over the age of fourteen who is not married is considered to be an old maid.  In our family, until the proper match is made in which both parents and the intended all agree that the match is right, there is no marriage.  I have to admit I am more comfortable with our traditions and am glad for rules which make sense and give guidance for the future.
Both Perry’s and my families have been helping the slaves escape across the North Fork of the White River from ArKanzas to freedom in the North and we were now being threatened with our lives.
A Creek in the Woods by Asher B.Durand
……………………………………
Five years earlier, the year of 1856 was not only the first year Perry’s father made money with his Peach Brandy but also it was the year that a group of Missourians marched to Kanzas and laid siege on the town of Lawrence, killing one man and burning many buildings.  It was soon after that Serenia’s and Perry’s families began assisting the Jayhawkers who opposed slavery.  Kanzas had just recently become a free State which was why the Johnsons and Campbells knew that their safety lay in northern Missouri (at least until they could earn enough money to buy the wagons and provisions to reach Kanzas), which was around 230 miles or several weeks by wagons from their homes on the White River.
……………………………
Serenia knew she should get downstairs to help Mama put supper on the table and knew also they would be cooking until late in the evening and all day tomorrow to have all the “delights” for the wedding.  She smiled great big imagining how exciting this was going to be.  It sure was more fun smiling than frowning….as it seemed they all did more than not of late.
…………………………….
Hip-Hip_huray by Peder Severin Kroyer
            Serenia awoke the next morning smelling her Mama’s Kolaches made with her homemade peach jam and coffee and realized it was her wedding day.  She could hear the family and friends moving furniture around to accommodate the chairs for the ceremony and felt warm and blessed to have a family who cared so much for her that they would take this cherished time out of their work to make this day so special for her and her treasured Perry.  Lizzie Doll and Barbara were both already up and helping the women folk complete the food preparations.  She could smell the first wafting of sweet potato pies and mince meat pies…her personal favorite.  She was sure her Aunt Barbara (her sister Babs namesake) would be providing the wedding cake for them.  She was known for her baking prowess.  It was not a surprise she was the largest of the women folk since she sampled her wonderful creations for the family and friends.  Perry’s father’s Peach Brandy would be in great profusion since he had not been able of late to ship much of it to New Orleans.  Nearly all the transportation was being taken over by the north and south troops forming up and confiscating whatever supplies they needed but had not been provided by their leaders.
            Serenia donned her wedding dress which was her Sunday best skirt but with a new blouse which she had been working on for several months as time allowed.  It had the overlaid sleeves which were popular and was pleated to the waist in a V bodice with a neckline ruffle of the same fabric.  She had chosen organza in white, since she was supposed to, but also because this was going to be easy to keep clean when she could throw it in with the regular underclothes when it needed cleaning.  Perry had given her a gift of his Mother’s cameo to wear at her neckline and she felt truly loved to be pinning it on for her wedding day.
 (Taken from Chapter One of SERENIA'S KANZAS)



[1] This is now located in the Mark Twin National Forest

Saturday, March 9, 2013

SERENIA'S KANZAS.....An honest look at Kansas Pioneers

Albert Bierstadt's Buffalo Crossing at Sunset
Ever wonder what the world was like in Kansas and Missouri just before, during and after the Civil War?  Now you can take a peek at two families' lives who strove to keep to their Christian training by helping the slaves escape.  This book, SERENIA'S KANZAS takes you into this private world and shows how this became for these families' an ultimate sacrifice that stripped them of their own means of living and threw them into a frightening world filled with the unknown, uncivilized Native Americans, and a rough hewn land where one had to start by carving out a house and begin all over again.  Here then is an excerpt:

"The path the men had chosen took them from Rock Springs and would take them to Elm Creek about lunch time.  Then they would have to cross the Smoky Hill River soon thereafter where the Elm Creek and the Smoky Hill converged.    The land had grasses so tall that they covered the heads of most men.  The main stands of trees were confirmation of water running amongst their roots.  Also, the terrain consisted of rolling hills which were wide and far apart, wherein an Indian could hide if trying to remain hidden.  It was most beautiful at daybreak and sunset with colors so vibrant that the best artist would be hard pressed to recreate the vibrancy of the displays.
About the time they reached the convergence and were planning to break for lunch they heard the rumble of an approaching herd of buffalo and then saw their second herd of buffalo winding their way across Elm Creek as they drank of the waters within.  The skies were looking like a storm might be brewing but they had to await the herd or possibly be stampeded by the dumb animals.[1]          
They stopped short of the herd and decided to have their lunch while watching the enormous herd that went as far as the eye could see into the horizon slowly cross this body of water.  When the lunch was over the beasts were nearly across the stream and where they had crossed, there was no water.  This would be a story to share with grandchildren in the ages to come, for sure.
            The families had spent an extra hour awaiting the herd’s slow progress and were glad they were not that far from their goal.  The crossing of the Smoky Hill River was easy with so little water left from where the buffalo had drunk, leaving mostly just mud to follow to the other side.  There was quite a bit of mud, but actually more sand than mud and the children begged to walk it, thinking it safe with the low water level.  Nellie had to explain to the boys about undercurrents and quicksand to frighten them enough to not want to try this foolish request.
            The fact that the water was gone exactly where the two wagons would be crossing only made their crossing that much easier.
            “We will have to thank the Lord for this over our meal this evening, Perry.” Ira offered. 
            “I agree.  It puts me in mind of Moses parting the water.  It was beyond fortuitous; it is right up there with miraculous in my book.” Perry agreed, shaking his head at the immensity of such a miracle."




[1] Buffalo were known to stampede when spooked.

Sunday, July 8, 2012

Copied from KANSAS PLAINS Blogspot


'KANZAS' 150 YEARS AGO ?

Ever wonder what Kansas (Kanzas) was like 150 years ago? Get a copy ofSerenia’s Kanzas and wonder no more. Author Kathleen Boston McCune has drawn on five generations of family history to create a fictional portrait of what life in Kansas was like in those early days.

"Between illness, new infants and the inclement weather typical of the Ellsworth, Kansas area in both winter and summer, the family struggles but perseveres midst Indian raids and cattle herds which take out their cropland and fences."

Serenia’s Kanzas is available from Barnes & Noble, Abe Books, Blackwell and Amazon in soft cover and e-book.

Posted by Peg Nichols of Salina

Memories of A Baby Boomer

Memories of  A Baby Boomer
First Dance in Jarbalo